Turtle Bay
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Public Art

MUSEUM

 

ARTS & CULTURE

at Turtle Bay Exploration Park

 

Public Art

Turtle Bay Exploration Park is part of the Redding Cultural District and the campus features many works of public art. Stroll along the trail from the Monolith, visit one of our families of artistic turtles by the Museum Store, cross the Sundial Bridge, and head west into the gardens to look for sculptures, fountains, and other playful works of art. 

Sundial Bridge
Concrete, granite, glass, steel. Soaring up in to the sky and linking both side of Turtle Bay’s campus, Santiago Calatrava’s masterpiece is art you can walk on. For all the details about this feat of architecture, visit the Dam to Bridge exhibit in the Museum.

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Buster Simpson Monolith
Ceramic, Steel, Concrete, Aluminum, Stone, Paint. Seattle-based artist Buster Simpson transformed the historic Monolith, the last remaining trace of the massive operation required to build Shasta Dam, into a work of public art to honor the history and those involved in the construction of the dam.

Colleen Barry Turtles
Concrete, ceramics, glass, stone. Located on the River Trail right the museum front door, this family of mosaic turtles reminds us to slow down and enjoy the beauty that surrounds us.

Paul Rideout Pyramids
Concrete, ceramic tile, glaze. Created by Paul "Palul" Rideout, Pyramids is a study of harmonies, forms, symbols, rhythms, and man and is located at the East end of the McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens.

Colleen Barry’s Earthstone
Cast concrete, stone, glass, and ceramic with embedded tile and contemporary manufactured materials.Earthstone celebrates the flora and fauna of Northern California and was created by local artist Colleen Barry. The monolithic sculpture is dedicated to the late Don Oestreicher, former Vice President of Citizens Utilities, and was commissioned by Lawrence Dillon and is located in the McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens

Betsy Damon Sounds of Water
Granite, marble, concrete, ceramic. How much water do you use? Betsy Damon’s sculpture is located on the central corridor of the McConnell Arboretum & Gardens.  It is a contemplative space that provides subtle messages about how we use water in California.

Colleen Barry Mosaic Oasis
Concrete, ceramics, glass, stone, found objects. Redding-based artist Colleen Barry created a seating area and fountain located in the Children’s Garden near the West gate of the McConnell Arboretum & Bontanical Gardens.  Mosaic Oasis emphasizes recycling through adaptive reuse of materials donated by dozens of area residents.

Troy Corliss Turtles
Fiberglass-reinforced and stained cast concrete. Originally commissioned for our Visitor Center in 2000, Troy’s family of Western Pond Turtles and Red-eared Sliders now welcome you to the West Entrance of Turtle Bay’s McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens.

Past Works - Some art is made to be temporary.
Patrick Dougherty’s Lookout Tree. Willow. Created by sculptor Patrick Dougherty, Lookout Tree was a two-year installation, a willow structure within one of the most majestic trees in the McConnell Arboretum & Gardens site, the immense oak inside the West gate.