Animal Programs

The animal programs at Turtle Bay inspire, create connections, and foster appreciation for the diversity and magnificence of wildlife through conservation, education and entertainment.  Come out to Turtle Bay and experience first-hand our animal friends!

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Meet some of our animal friends!

Spike

Spike, our North American porcupine was born at the Houston Zoo on March 29, 2003 and is now a permanent resident at Turtle Bay. She has a very gentle disposition and can be seen in the Walk on the Wild Side Animal Show throughout the summer and in the Animal Parades throughout the winter.

Ned

Ned, the Black vulture, would find his meals in the wild by following Turkey vultures to their meals! Black vultures can be found throughout the southeastern U.S. with great numbers in Florida and down into Central and South America.  Ned is a member of the Walk on the Wild Side Animal Show cast. Photo provided by Gallery One.


Chico, the gopher snake, often pretends to be a rattlesnake by putting his tail in leaves and shaking it rapidly.  It is a sure way to keep safe from predators.  Gopher snakes are found throughout California and are often mis-identified as rattlesnakes.  Their color pattern is similar, but they lack the triangular shaped head and are not venomous.

Gidget, a Sulpher-crested cockatoo, has been performing in educational shows his entire life...since 1984!  These birds are found in Australia, and although beautiful, do not make good pets.  Their large beaks are designed to crack open nuts and tear into thick-skinned fruit.  Their very loud screaming call is used to wake up the flock early in the morning.


Mojave, a desert tortoise, is over 40 years old.  Like most captive desert tortoises, he suffers from a respiratory virus that he will have for the rest of his life.  Desert tortoises can live to be over 100 years old and actually spend up to 95% of their life underground in burrows where they can stay cool from the hot desert sun.


Nashi, our Raccoon, was found injured as a kit.  Her tail was so damaged that it had to be removed to save her life.  She loves to play in water or sleep in the hammock we made for her.  Searching with her super-sensitive hands is one of her greatest assets to survive in the wild.

Aerea, a female Red-tailed hawk, has been at Turtle Bay since 1999.  She is completely blind in her left eye and can no longer hunt on her own in the wild.  Red-tailed hawks are the most widespread hawk in North America and are known for soaring over open areas and sitting along the roadways searching for mice.  Aerea is one of the stars of the Animal Show where she awes people with her beautiful flights.  Photo provided by Gallery One.

Lories, or lorikeets are featured in our beautiful year-round Parrot Playhouse.  Feed these magnificent creatures right from your hand!
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adopt an animal!

Inali the gray foxSupport the animals of Turtle Bay Exploration Park by making them an honorary part of your family! All animals need lots of love and support. You can help feed and care for an animal at Turtle Bay by making them a part of your life. Click here for more information.


Conservation

Paul Bunyan's Forest Camp exhibits wild animals, many of which have been rescued and would not survive if released.  Much of Northern California's natural beauty is in its widespread forests. Forests provide habitat for many of these creatures. Turtle Bay celebrates the relationship between these magnificent forests and the animals that live there. Through forestry and animal education guests will experience the close relationships we all have to our environment.